West Michigan high school student receives $40K scholarship, Amazon internship

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Bradley Bunch received the Amazon Future Engineer scholarship to study computer science at MIT over the next four years. Courtesy Amazon

A Delton Kellogg High School senior was one of 100 students in the country to receive a $40,000 scholarship to continue studying computer science in college this fall.

Bradley Bunch received the Amazon Future Engineer scholarship to study computer science at MIT over the next four years. With the scholarship, Bunch is guaranteed a paid internship offer at Amazon after his freshman year of college to gain critical real-world work experience.

Amazon Future Engineer is a childhood-to-career computer science education program. As a student of the program, Bunch got to explore computer science through school curriculum and project-based learning using code to make music, program robots and solve problems.

Each year, 100 students are selected to receive a four-year, $40,000 scholarship. Recipients were chosen based on a variety of criteria, including their academic achievement, demonstrated leadership, participation in school and community activities, work experience, future goals and financial need.

“Bradley is an amazing student that has worked very hard for all of his achievements,” said Lucas Trierweiler, director of special education and principal at Delton Kellogg Public Schools. “He is an outstanding young man that has unlimited potential and a work ethic that is second to none. Bradley is always looking to better himself and others.”

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that from 2019-29, the market for computer science professionals will grow 11% faster than the average for all occupations.

In 2020, the median annual wage for computer and information technology occupations was $91,250, which is more than twice the median annual wage for all occupations in the U.S.

Computer science is the fastest-growing profession within the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) field, but only 8% of STEM graduates earn a computer science degree with a small percentage from underserved backgrounds. Students from underserved backgrounds are eight to 10 times more likely to pursue college degrees in computer science if they have taken AP computer science in high school.

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