Spectrum Health first hospital in nation to deploy new epilepsy treatment

373
In deep brain stimulation therapy, a neurosurgeon implants a small pacemaker-like device that connects with a lead and sends electrical signals to targeted areas in the brain that control movement and regions susceptible to the generation of seizures. Courtesy Spectrum Health

Spectrum Health employed a new and sophisticated medical device to ease some symptoms associated with medically refractory epilepsy and certain movement disorders.

The device, the SenSight Directional Lead System for deep brain stimulation therapy, is manufactured by Medtronic. It was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May to treat certain types of epilepsy and some symptoms associated with movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and essential tremor.

Spectrum was the first hospital in the U.S. to use the device to treat a patient with epilepsy and the first in Michigan to use it to treat a patient with Parkinson’s disease.

In deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy, a neurosurgeon implants a small pacemaker-like device that connects with a lead and sends electrical signals to targeted areas in the brain that control movement and regions susceptible to the generation of seizures. After surgery, a neurologist wirelessly adjusts the settings to best control symptoms while minimizing potential side effects.

DBS therapy is not new at Spectrum Health, but the SenSight system takes it to a new level when paired with Medtronic’s Percept PC neurostimulator, as it records the patient’s brain signals and provides more precise and targeted electrical signals, resulting in more efficient and informed programming.

“Because this newer technology can record brain signals, we now have objective data that will allow us to look for patterns and make adjustments accordingly,” said Dr. Rushna Ali, M.D., the Spectrum Health neurosurgeon who on July 2 became the first provider in Michigan to implant the device in a patient with Parkinson’s disease.

“This objective data, along with the directionality of the leads, will help us better understand and treat movement disorders and epilepsy. The goal is to improve the quality of life for our patients with this more personalized and innovative care,” said Dr. Sanjay Patra, M.D., the division chief of Spectrum Health neurosurgery who implanted the device June 8 in a patient with medically refractory epilepsy, making him the first in the nation to use the device to curtail epileptic seizures in a patient.

SenSight, along with other therapeutic devices at Spectrum Heath, enables the treatment teams to individually tailor therapy for patients with disabling movement disorders and epilepsy.

Facebook Comments