Entrepreneur reopens downtown coworking space

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Located in the historic Harris Building, the 2,300-square-foot coworking space is geared toward creative professionals looking to grow their networks, skills and career. Courtesy Little Space Studio

After closing her coworking space in March due to the pandemic, a local entrepreneur reconfigured and reopened the studio with safety procedures in place.

Founder and CEO Alysha Lach-White, who also is a freelance illustrator, reopened the first floor of her coworking facility Little Space Studio (LSS) at 111 S. Division Ave. on Monday.

Located in the historic Harris Building, the 2,300-square-foot coworking space is geared toward creative professionals looking to grow their networks, skills and career, Lach-White said.

“I started Little Space Studio because of my own journey and the journey of those around me of trying to learn how to freelance as you go,” she said. “It’s a very difficult thing to do. You need legitimate mentors and a way into your industry.”

After closing in March, Lach-White and her team spent time reconfiguring the space for social distancing and implementing COVID-19 health and safety procedures to allow members to safely cowork.

LSS currently is completing construction on an additional 5,000 square feet of workspace on the Harris Building’s third floor, which will open for exclusive professional-level memberships later this year.

Memberships currently are available at various price points, from a $15 for a day pass to $200 for a monthly membership, and they include access to private call booths, discounts on professional multimedia studios, conference rooms, craft space, digital workstations, digital platform access, sustainability consulting, educational events and a built-in community of creative professionals working at all different levels.

“There is a very strong human component for people who do creative work,” Lach-White said. “They just need the support of (people). I wanted to start a space that fostered that support and have it be mutual between juniors and seniors of different industries.

“We have a network of experienced creatives that (members) can consult on anything from navigating a project to figuring out billing. You can talk to us literally anytime. We are all trying to build sustainable careers, and we can rise up with each other.”

The digital workstations at LSS provide members access to tools that are necessary to produce high-level work but that typically have a prohibitive price tag. This access allows beginners to build a portfolio of clients without a large financial investment. For established professionals, it provides an already optimized workspace.

For those who may not be ready to work on-site, a digital membership is available. Digital members have access to a Slack channel, job board, exclusive content and learning opportunities.

Lach-White said LSS is designed for members to take ownership of the space, an element of creative work that she believes many coworking spaces lack.

“Push tables together, move furniture around, claim a corner if you are working with a team, put tape on the walls,” she said. “It is a dynamic space. It encourages you to make a little bit of mess. We want innovation to happen here.”

More information on LSS memberships is ​available at littlespacestudio.com/cowork

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